Risk Management Ontologies

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Risk Management Ontologies

Open Risk is supporting the development of semantic web technologies to support risk management efforts. This page organizes the currently developed / published tools.

In principle any semantic technology can be the starting point for risk management ontologies. Open Risk adopts the W3C’s Web Ontology Language (OWL).

OWL is a Semantic Web language designed to represent rich and complex knowledge about things, groups of things, and relations between things. OWL is a computational logic-based language such that knowledge expressed in OWL can be exploited by computer programs, e.g., to verify the consistency of that knowledge or to make implicit knowledge explicit.

OWL documents, known as ontologies, can be published in the World Wide Web and may refer to or be referred from other OWL ontologies. OWL is part of the W3C’s Semantic Web technology stack, which includes RDF, RDFS, SPARQL, etc

The Credit Ratings Ontology

The Credit Ratings Ontology is a framework that aims to represent and categorize knowledge about Credit Rating Agencies and related data (Credit Ratings) using semantic web information technologies.

DOAM


The Non Performing Loan Ontology

The Non Performing Loan Ontology is a framework that aims to represent and categorize knowledge about non performing loans using semantic web information technologies.

DOAM


The Risk Model Ontology

The Risk Model Ontology is a framework that aims to represent and categorize knowledge about risk models using semantic web information technologies. The Risk Model Ontology, codenamed Description of a Model (DOAM) codifies the relationship between the various components of a risk model universe.

DOAM


The Risk Function Ontology

The Risk Function Ontology is a framework that aims to represent and categorize knowledge about risk management functions. Codenamed RFO, it codifies the relationship (roles and responsibilities) between the various persons involved in a risk management organization.

The ontology allows the definition of risk management roles in more precise terms, which in turn can be used in a variety of contexts: towards better structured actual job descriptions, more accurate description of internal processes and easier inspection of alignement and consistency with risk taxonomies

RFO Visualization